Haunted Towns – Savannah – S01E03

haunted-towns-s01e03-savannahThe next investigation takes place in Savannah, which reputes itself as one of the most haunted towns in America. Everyone has a paranormal tale to tell, but these are the same as in every other town that claims itself to be haunted. When you listen, all the stories start with, “the story goes”, “people believe”, “what we’re told”. This means they’re unsupported myths.

In Wright Square, Chris and the team are investigating the stories of Alice Riley and Richard White who were hanged in connection with the murder of William Wise. However, no one agrees on what that story is. At first, Alice and Richard killed William by drowning him in a barrel, but then it changes to Alice slit his throat. James, the local historian confirms the dubious nature of these stories when even he uses, “people believe” when referring to Wright Square. And that’s the preface when discussing how the bodies were removed to make way for new buildings. “People believe some of the bodies were left behind.”

They start off the investigation in Wright Square and the aptly named, Wright Square Cafe, where the manager revealed his own experiences, one involving a knife moving entity.

Doogie and Brandon take on the square, where they feel they get responses when discussing Alice. To them, this is confirmed by the word, “lust” on the Ovilus.

As Chris and Porter investigate the cafe, Chris says he sees a shadow, which is followed by a whisper and then a pop. Thinking back to what the manager said, they lay a knife on the table. As we expect, the knife has moved. It just didn’t move on camera.

For day 2, they investigate the Liquid Sands shop, where bags of packing peanuts fly off the shelves, rather than just falling, and a glass sculpture supposedly moved on it’s own, also called falling and rolling.

Chris and Porter get permission to investigate the Oglethorpe House, which stands on the site of the old gallows. As they interview Mike, the battery on the camera dies, which is surely a sign of the paranormal and not incompetence or cheap equipment.

Like the other “stories”, there is one for Doctor Cox, who committed suicide by starving himself to death after giving his family Yellow Fever. A dubious story at best, but Chris feels it’s the real deal as his temperature reading goes to the paranormal cliche of 66.6.

Notice though, the reading was 66.8 as they started going down the stairs. It dropped to 66.6 then went right back up. But, when Chris asks for the entity to do it again, he shows a 66.6 again; after we come back from some blurry camera work.

As they investigate the Liquid Sands, they get a voice saying, “Get out” which is utterly indistinguishable. This is followed by, “Get a knife” which refers to the cafe a few doors down and Alice. Again, I don’t hear those words, but I do see Doogie pointing out the spot where the voice comes, marking when they need to give a reaction.

But to obscure the story of Alice even more, they get the word, “barrel” and “angry”. On the one hand they get voices from beyond talking about a knife. Next it’s the barrel. Even the sprits don’t know which story they’re supposed to play into. But it’s funny that Porter says, “the pieces of the puzzle are coming together.” Considering they can’t agree on a story, that’s an interesting comment.

Finally, as they work their way through the Oglethorpe House, Chris claims to hear his name mentioned by a child. And we have another dead battery. They don’t get anything from Doctor Cox, who is supposed to be just as active from all the “stories” but they will weave these items together as the story of Alice.

While Savannah revels in it’s haunted history, these accounts start with “the story goes”. And just like the story of Alice, people can’t even agree on the story. It makes you think they might be fabricated.

Moving past that, what evidence do they capture? The usual garbled blips of audio. Shadows not captured on camera. A knife placed in a different orientation, which again, wasn’t captured. And a dead battery.

So which of these is actions that can’t possibly be explained through normal means?

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